The Blog

Facial Expression – Practical Work 2

One of the work that i have been working on is Projecting animated Facial Expression into human head.

Facial Projection from Shkelzen Kernaja on Vimeo

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Facial_projection

 

 

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Facial_projection_2

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Facial_projection_3

 

Image 4

 

Facial_projection_4

I had great inspiration ‘Projection Mapping On A Human Face’

Chase No Face / BELL from Francisco Zamorano on Vimeo.

A music video for BELL
bellinspace.com

Visuals by Zach Lieberman, Francisco Zamorano, Andy Wallace, and Michelle Calabro.

(note: no post-production effects were used in this video. everything on the face is happening in real-time, via hacked Kinect, laptop and LED projector. It’s built using FaceTracker code from Jason Saragih)

some making of shots:
vimeo.com/​26704695

 

Projection mapping is one of those techniques whose popularity is only increasing with time, and its ubiquitous nature has brought about some interesting and inventive examples. For example, we’ve seen buildings come alive, interiors decorated, illuminated architectural scale models, and factories transform into theaters all meticulously planned and executed. Now we can add the latest music video from Brooklyn-based musician BELL to the ever growing list of novelty uses. It takes the human form as its canvas specifically lead vocalist Olga Bell’s face.

The video for “Chase No Face,” directed by Francisco Zamorano with visuals from Zach Lieberman, Andy Wallace, and Michelle Calabro, was made using a hacked Kinect, an LED projector, openFrameworks, a laptop and Jason Saragih’s FaceTracker code.

In the video, the projection mappings all happen in real-time, giving a rather

interesting and charming appearance to the video. As the augmented animations start dancing across Bell’s face, we’re drawn to the way they cling to the contours of her features, highlighting her lips, cheeks, eyes, etc. Using the singer’s face in this way enabled Zamorano to play around with the FaceTracker software in a way we haven’t seen yet, while adding emphasis to the lyrics and generating some playful yet precise footage. The end result looks simple yet entertaining.

Korean Rapper Yumdda Raises The Bar On Face Projections

Known for being MTV Korea’s funky and outspoken VJ, rapper Yumdda returns to the studio after a five-year hiatus to lay down some much- anticipated new music.
The music video for “Raise It Up” demonstrates a visual experiment that leaves an uncanny and rather in your face impression. The video, shot in a single take with an added layer of projection, draws you in so much so that you may have to watch a couple times to catch all his facial expressions. Watching multiple layers of Yumdda rap simultaneously makes it seem like we’re watching all his multiple personalities unravel.

Facial Expression – Practical Work

An Visualisation Method of Music Impression in Facial Expression to Represent Emotion.
In an attempt to provide a clear assessment of the theory that a physical facial change, involving only certain facial muscles, can result in an emotion. The visualisation method of music impression in facial expression to represent emotion. This method can measure the relationship between each impression of music data and face expression. This method can composite facial expression corresponding to impressions of a music data. Facial expression is one of nonverbal behaviors. The facial expression is important as media that convey various emotions effectively.

Facial Expression from Shkelzen Kernaja on Vimeo.

 

 

 

Facial Expression- Projection Mapping from Shkelzen Kernaja on Vimeo.

A study of facial expression in visual effect focusing on sound / adding sound. Can 3D workflow effectively inform how sound stimulate facial Anatomy?
I am interest how facial muscles react to the sound using different instruments and how muscle work. One of the works that influenced me is Duchenne of Boulogne, Duchenne wanted to determine how the muscles in the human face produce facial expressions, which he believed to be directly linked to the soul of man.
My attempt is to demonstrate emotions as well as individual muscles actions by using clean sounding instruments, and then we listen to it in order to incorporate different feelings and emotions to the character.

Some screen shot of my work of facial Projection.

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Facial_projection_head

Image 2.

Facial_projection_head_2

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Facial_projection_head_3

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Facial_projection_head_4

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Facial_projection_head_5

Final ‘Facial Expression- Projection Mapping’

 

Facial Expression- Projection Mapping from Shkelzen Kernaja on Vimeo.

A study of facial expression in visual effect focusing on sound / adding sound. Can 3D workflow effectively inform how sound stimulate facial Anatomy?
I am interest how facial muscles react to the sound using different instruments and how muscle work. One of the works that influenced me is Duchenne of Boulogne, Duchenne wanted to determine how the muscles in the human face produce facial expressions, which he believed to be directly linked to the soul of man.
My attempt is to demonstrate emotions as well as individual muscles actions by using clean sounding instru- ments, and then we listen to it in order to incorporate different feelings and emotions to the character.

Why? “Facial Expression”

The Theoretical Context

An Visualization Method of Music Impression in Facial Expression to Represent Emotion.
In an attempt to provide a clear assessment of the theory that a physical facial change, involving only certain facial muscles, can result in an emotion. The visualisation method of music impression in facial expression to represent emotion. This method can measure the relationship between each impression of music data and face expression. This method can composite facial expression corresponding to impressions of a music data. Facial expression is one of nonverbal behaviors. The facial expression is important as media that convey various emotions effectively.

Work in progress And the Final Work “Facial Expression”

My attempt is to demonstrate emotions as well as individual muscles actions by using clean sounding instruments, and then we listen to it in order to incorporate different feelings and emotions to the character.

This are some Screen Shot of my work.

First image shows 3D model of human facial muscles. Cinema 4D and sound reactive.

Screen Shot 2013-05-30 at 17.26.04

 

The Facial Muscles, and in particular those in the lips, help to shape the sound and air stream into recognizable speech. These muscles move the face in response to our thoughts, feelings, emotions and impulses. Actors work very carefully to learn how to isolate each muscle. It is useful to learn to recognize the various muscles in order to better isolate them, so that any extraneous movement is eliminated and the muscles used are those desired. Also by recognizing the muscles’ shape, it is easier to understand how these muscles move the face.

Screen Shot 2013-05-30 at 17.27.02

Screen shot of my work using Cinema 4D, linking sound with facial featureusing XPresso.

 

This is the final video that i have finished.

Facial Expression from Shkelzen Kernaja on Vimeo.

Facial Expression in VFX focusing on sound/adding Sound.
I am interest how facial muscles react to the sound using different instruments and how muscle work. One of the works that influenced me is Duchenne of Boulogne, Duchenne wanted to determine how the muscles in the human face produce facial expressions which he believed to be directly linked to the soul of man.

Cinema 4d and XPresso

If you think is cool Share it with friends.
many thanks

 

 

final Research “Facial Expression”

I have selected and show some of the artist that is making music with facial expression.

 

It seems everyone these days is looking for new ways to interact with computers and information. One might even say that we’re entering into “the age of the interface,” where actions and interactions are going to be guided by increasingly invisible and intuitive ways of meshing two environments together.

 

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Jonathan Hammond turns his face into a musical instrument.https://vimeo.com/26475997

Manabe’s latest experiment uses myoelectric (an electrical impulse that results in the contraction of muscle fibres) sensors to create a drum machine out of a human body. Attaching touch sensors to his hands, Manabe sends electric pulses to his friend, and in turn generates sound and makes his friend’s face twitch in the process.

Screen Shot 2013-05-30 at 18.39.38

Electric stimulus to face -test3 ( Daito Manabe )

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxdlYFCp5Ic&feature=player_embedded

once you start watching the video, its shows the use keyboard to trigger the instruments via Crews’ muscles, creating your own song, play Terry Crews like an instrument!

 

Screen Shot 2013-05-30 at 18.47.24

Old Spice Muscle Music https://vimeo.com/47875656

Work in progress “Facial Expression”

I have been experimenting by using kinect and faceshift  which “analyses the face motions of an actor, and describes them as a mixture of basic expressions, plus head orientation and gaze. This description is then used to animate virtual characters for use in movie or game production.”

Print screen

faceshift02

 

I have recorded my motion and displayed all of them at the same time.

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There was another thing that i did is that i used motion tracking data to create and abstract pice which it was inspired from the flower “Venus flytrap”

Screen Shot 2013-04-08 at 00.53.08

Facial Expression research

A study of facial expression in Visual Effect, Focusing on sound/ adding sound.
Can 3D workflow effectively inform how sound stimulate facial Anatomy?

I am interest how facial muscles react to the sound using different instruments and how muscle work. One of the works that influenced me is Duchenne of Boulogne, Duchenne wanted to determine how the muscles in the human face produce facial expressions which he believed to be directly linked to the soul of man.

Certain sounds have different effects from other ones. We respond differently to a Mozart sonata than to a rock, and hip pop concert. Some proper names seem soft and pleasing to us; others seem harsh and unpleasant. While our responses may be partly due to past experiences, our personal associations with different sounds, there are good reasons to suppose that we also have innate responses to certain sounds.

 

 

 

Dr. Duchenne of Bologna, a nineteenth-century French scientist, became famous for his explorations of muscle fuction using electrical stimulation. In his book Mecanisme de la physionomie humaine, he illustrated the actions of

stimulating

many of the facial muscles by photographing subjects whose face he ‘stimulated’ with electrified needles (he said to be very unpleasant feeling).

Dr. Duchenne wanted to determine how the muscles in the human face produce facial expressions, which he believed to be directly linked to the soul of man.

Duchenne used this technique to attempt to demonstrate emotions as well as individual muscles actions. Here multiple electrodes are employed, applied to both the neck and the forehead, to illustrate the expression of fear. The muscles activated include the corrugator, the frontalis (forehead), and risorius and platysma (neck)

He is known, in particular, for the way he triggered muscular contractions with electrical probes, recording the resulting distorted and often grotesque expressions with the recently invented camera. He published his findings in 1862, together with extraordinary photographs of the induced expressions, in the book The Mechanism of Human Physiognomy (Mecanisme de la physionomie Humaine).

 

dus2b

Screen Shot 2013-06-01 at 17.56.16

The way the facial muscles are mixed in with everything else under the skin made life very difficult early anatomist trying to map out the muscles of the face. The famous anatomy of Vesalius, published in the late 1500s shows the facial muscles in vague and misleading way. Other muscular systems of the body, large and easier to dissect, were more accurately portrayed. Nearly a century earlier, another pioneer anatomist had patiently explored and diagrammed the facial muscles in beautiful, accurate drawings. But the anatomical drawings of Leonardo da Vinci, like so much of his scientific and artwork were by time of Vesalius scattered in private collections and unknown

to the world at large. The anatomical text Leonardo intended to publish had never been realized.
In Leonardo’s case, the result of all his meticulous effort was not just anatomical drawings. The men in his battles scenes, just like the women in his portrait, have faces more real, and more alive, than any that had appeared in painting before. Science in the service of art led to a master of expression. Though Leonardo and others had mapped out the facial muscles, the function of the various muscles were not well understood until the nineteenth century. In the mid-nineteenth century, Duchenne of Boulogne found that slight electrical jolts to various point on the face caused the muscles to contract individually. His photographs of electrically induced smiles and snarls are both strange and compelling; his descriptions of which muscles do what, and important advance.

The question of why we smile and snarl was addressed by a man more famous for his work in another field. Charles Darwin’s book on facial expression, The Expression, The Expression of emotion in Man and Animals (1872), remains to this day probably the single best book on the subject. Making use of the work of Duchenne and others, Darwin speculated about why we make he face we do and whether they are specific or universal.

In recent times there has been a resurgence of interest in facial expression, led not by artist or anatomist but by psychologists interested in the real of nonverbal communication.

Final Stereoscopic titling proposals

 

Title sequence in anaglyph – four shots from Shkelzen Kernaja on Vimeo.

Titling is created by Catherine Lui – 2rd Visual Effects

Titling is created by Victoria Smith – 2nd Visual Effects

Title sequence in anaglyph from VBadwolf on Vimeo.

The work that Victoria and Catherine has created are interesting but they could have done more to improve the titling and learn how to use the program properly. With the time we had as a group we were able to produce a professional piece of work with my work. If we had more time i could have helped Catherine and Victoria complete their contributions to a much higher standard.  The work produced are all very interesting and varied which means that by having a diverse group makes for an even more interesting results.

 

 

Stereoscopic titling proposals

Lecturer Mike would like the group to come up with another piece of work in order to complete the unit successfully to shoot a scene of a location of you group choice, The 4 group members agreed on Stereoscopic titling proposals. 3 from me and 1 from Catherine and 1 from Victoria. The Producer and Director agreed that the group should meet at the College in January 2013 with ideas on what other 3D Stereoscopic project they wish to carry out and what visual effects they want to create, for the next group project. The Producer has asked each member to come up with an idea.

My ideas where to create one Ident in motion graphic style using a “word from a book, magazine, newspaper’ and ‘text, number’ that can be used in the scene, this video where very inspired and i wanted to create something Like “MTV ‘Organic’ – Umeric

MTV ‘Organic’ – Umeric from Umeric on Vimeo.

there was a problem that i could not create any motion graphic tv ident because i had to work in my previous work that i did “Pave the Way”

Me and Diepiri MacPepple-Jaja – The Producer we chose a 4 different location to shoot the scene in the Libray at Ravensbourne

this are some screen shot of the video that we shoot

library

library

 

Screen Shot 2013-01-25 at 23.25.47

 

once we finished shooting the library scene i was the only one in my group that i had the knowledgment  to track in Boujou 5 it which is called ‘match moving’ . ”Match moving” is a cinematic technique that allows the insertion of computer graphics into Live-action footage with correct position, scale, orientation, and motion relative to the photographed objects in the shot.

This is screen shot of Boujou 5 that was able to tracking successfully and i had to Export the camera footage to Cinema 4D that allows  ’Catherine Lui – 2rd Visual Effects’ to work and in Autodesk Maya that allows Victoria Smith – 3nd Visual Effects to work.

tracking